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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the obama administration is still trying to determine who was responsible for the assault on the u.s. mission in benghazi tt killed a u.s. ambassador earlier this month. >> i think pretty clearly it was a terrorist attack. >> brown: at the pentagon today, defense secretary leon panetta seemed to have little doubt about what happened at the u.s. consulate in libya more than two weeks ago. >> a group of terrorists obviously conducted that attack on the consulate and against our individuals. what terrorists were involved, i think, remains to be determined by an investigation, but it clearly was a group of terrorists who conducted that attack against the facility. >> brown: what seemed clear today, though, had seemed less so just days ago. the original explanation for what happened the evening of september 11 was that an america-made movie denigrating islam had incited a mob, which had then stormed the u.s. consulate in benghazi. that attack left four americans dead, including u.s. ambassador to libya, christopher stephens. but in the weeks since, even as protests spread across the mu
.s. officials as an eruption of anger at an anti-islam film. the obama administration has since reversed that appraisal and now calls it a well coordinated terrorist attack. but questions have mounted over the shifting assessments. and today two republican congressmen, oversight committee chairman darrell issa of california and jays leveled new allegations. in a letter to secretary of state clinton, they charged washington rejected multiple requests for security improvements at been gas emission. they base their assertions on unidentified sources described as multiple u.s. federal government officials. the state department spokeswoman said the secretary would respond in writing this very day. >> her response is going to be relatively succinct today, as i said, expressing her complete commitment to work with the congress to get fully to the bottom of this. but i don't anticipate she'll be able to answer the specific questions today >> warner: the two congressmen say their committee will hold a hearing next wednesday on the libya attack. meanwhile the f.b.i. has sent a team to libya to det
stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we return to president obama's unitedded nations' speech and what it tells us about his administration's foreign policy challenges. for that we turn to harvard university professor and former u.s. ambassador nicholas burns and richard haas, president of the council on foreign relations. welcome to you both. starting with you, richard haas, let's take an overview. is the obama foreign policy defendable four years later? >> for sure it's defendable. it's not to say it's flawless. but he can point to obviously the killing of osama bin laden. he can point to, among other things, the attempt to improve relations with china and russia. obviously he's got the uwe united states out of iraq. the united states after going up has now come down to some extent in afghanistan. the middle east, even though it's turbulent, is more open than it was. so i think the president in general can point to some areas where he moved forward and some areas obviously his critics will say where he movedded back. all in all it's a defense i believe and defendable record. >> ifill
administration also would not provide additional funds to cover more recipients during a recession. in contrast to how the law currently works. president obama argues that romney's proposal would cut coverage and services to the needy including seniors. >> here's the deal the states would be getting. they would have to be running these programs in the face of the largest cut to medicaid that has ever been proposed. a cut that according to one nonpartisan group would take away health care for about 19 million americans. 19 million. >> sreenivasan: bob green stein is the founder and president of the center on budget and policy priorities. he says governor romney's block grant proposal would hurt many patients. >> the biggest changes would be for the elderly and the disabled. the elderly and disabled are one quarter of medicaid beneficiaries but two thirds of the cost. that will rise as the population ages and there is no way you can extract savings of this magnitude without dramatickic reductions in health care for low-income people who are seniors or who have disables. >> sreenivasan: greenstein
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)